http://www.secondsout.com/columns/john-l-sullivan-revisitedJohn L Sullivan RevisitedenJohn L Sullivan RevisitedSecondsOut.comMon, 31 Aug 2015 14:31:54 -0100http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rssinfo@secondsout.comJohn L Sullivan Revisitedhttp://www.secondsout.com/AcuCustom/Sitename/Icon/Logo/contact_generic_2008.jpghttp://www.secondsout.com/columns/john-l-sullivan-revisited1440http://www.affino.comhttp://www.secondsout.com/columns/thomas-hauser/john-l-sullivan-revisited-part-1John L. Sullivan Revisited: Part 1<div style="display:block;"><div style="float:left;"><a href="http://www.secondsout.com/columns/thomas-hauser/john-l-sullivan-revisited-part-1"><img src="http://www.secondsout.com/AcuCustom/Sitename/DAM/018/SullivanJohnLarmscrossedgeneric_lxth.jpg" border="0" hspace="5" vspace="5" /></a></div><div style="float:left;">By Thomas Hauser <br /><br />Next month will mark the 150th anniversary of the birth of John L. Sullivan.<br /><br />In recent decades, Sullivan has faded from memory. To many, he’s now more myth than reality, a sporting Paul Bunyan. In a way, that’s fitting because, in his era, Sullivan was a near-mythic figure as large as Babe Ruth, Joe Louis, and Muhammad Ali were in their prime. He was America’s first mass-culture hero and the most idolized athlete who had lived up until his time. </div></div>Mon, 01 Sep 2008 04:25:00 +0000http://www.secondsout.com/columns/thomas-hauser/john-l-sullivan-revisited-part-1http://www.secondsout.com/columns/thomas-hauser/john-l-sullivan-revisited-part-2John L. Sullivan Revisited: Part 2<div style="display:block;"><div style="float:left;"><a href="http://www.secondsout.com/columns/thomas-hauser/john-l-sullivan-revisited-part-2"><img src="http://www.secondsout.com/AcuCustom/Sitename/DAM/019/TheRingcoverOct1934Sulliv_lxth.jpg" border="0" hspace="5" vspace="5" /></a></div><div style="float:left;">By Thomas Hauser<br /><br />Throughout American history prior to John L. Sullivan’s ascent, most recreational activity had a practical side. Horse racing was the nation’s most popular spectator sport, but hunting and fishing were far more prevalent. </div></div>Mon, 08 Sep 2008 02:43:00 +0000http://www.secondsout.com/columns/thomas-hauser/john-l-sullivan-revisited-part-2http://www.secondsout.com/columns/thomas-hauser/john-l-sullivan-revisited-part-3John L. Sullivan Revisited: Part 3<div style="display:block;"><div style="float:left;"><a href="http://www.secondsout.com/columns/thomas-hauser/john-l-sullivan-revisited-part-3"><img src="http://www.secondsout.com/AcuCustom/Sitename/DAM/020/SullivanJohnLblueribbonto_lxth.jpg" border="0" hspace="5" vspace="5" /></a></div><div style="float:left;">By Thomas Hauser<br /> <br />The Marquis of Queensberry Rules that John L. Sullivan proselytized for throughout his career didn’t make boxing less violent. Gloves were worn to protect fists, not an opponent’s brain. And under the new rules, a fighter could no longer gain thirty seconds of relief by falling to the ground. </div></div>Mon, 15 Sep 2008 04:15:00 +0000http://www.secondsout.com/columns/thomas-hauser/john-l-sullivan-revisited-part-3