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23 OCTOBER 2014

 




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John L Sullivan Revisited





Thomas Hauser is the author of 34 books including 'Muhammad Ali: His Life And Times'. In 2005, he was honored by the Boxing Writers Association of America, which bestowed the Nat Fleischer Award for career excellence in boxing journalism upon him. He was the first Internet writer ever to receive the honor. Thomas describes writing for Secondsout.com as a chance to 'explore new frontiers and deliver cutting-edge material to website readers'. His next book - ‘The Greatest Sport of All' - will be published by the University of Arkansas Press later this year.

 

Use the search box below to reference Hauser's entire archive from 2001 to date on Secondsout.





Features Articles
1 - 50 of 305   Articles
Paulie Malignaggi: The Week After

Paulie Malignaggi: The Week After

By Thomas Hauser: Portobello’s is a pizzeria in lower Manhattan. Entering the restaurant, patrons pass a long glass-partitioned counter that displays pies with a dozen different toppings. There’s a large soda refrigeration case and two more counters where hot entrees and deli sandwiches are served. But the pizza is the main draw. Paulie Malignaggi: The Week After
Seanie Monaghan Loves To Fight

Seanie Monaghan Loves To Fight

By Thomas Hauser: Seanie Monaghan is a “throwback fighter.” In the 1940s, he would have been a neighborhood fight club headliner and local hero. Seanie Monaghan Loves To Fight
Don King In The Twilight

Don King In The Twilight

By Thomas Hauser: Don King arrived at Barclays Center for the March 9th IBF 175-pound title fight between Bernard Hopkins and Tavoris Cloud shortly after 8:00 p.m. Don King In The Twilight
Archie Moore Revisited: Part Three

Archie Moore Revisited: Part Three

By Thomas Hauser: Archie Moore’s 1958 fight against Yvon Durelle was the star atop the Christmas tree of the Archie Moore legend. The bout was the first title fight held outside the United States to be televised live in America and it captured the imagination of the nation. Archie Moore Revisited: Part Three
Archie Moore Revisited: Part Two

Archie Moore Revisited: Part Two

By Thomas Hauser: “Becoming champion created a new world for me,” Archie Moore wrote in his autobiography. “It was tangible proof that I was doing a good job in my chosen profession. It fulfilled a need everybody has - the need to feel important. Winning the championship was also the fulfillment of a dream. And it’s nice to have dreams come true.” Archie Moore Revisited: Part Two
Archie Moore Revisited: Part One

Archie Moore Revisited: Part One

By Thomas Hauser: Archie Moore was a self-educated man who brought a philosophical veneer to a hard brutal sport. He’s revered today, not for a handful of signature fights but as a symbol of skill, craftsmanship, and boxing genius who persevered in the face of adversity and overwhelming odds. Archie Moore Revisited: Part One
Paulie Malignaggi Won’t Go Away

Paulie Malignaggi Won’t Go Away

By Thomas Hauser: On July 7, 2001, Paulie Malignaggi made his pro debut at Keyspan Park in Brooklyn. Even then, he had a mouth. Two days before the fight, he told Tom Gerbasi, “I’m boxing’s next superstar. Paulie Malignaggi is going to make it up the ladder quickly. I’m going to win multiple titles. I’m going to explode on the scene. I’m looking to make a big splash. And once you see me, I’m going to be here for a while.” Paulie Malignaggi Won’t Go Away
Martinez-Chavez: Peaks and Valleys

Martinez-Chavez: Peaks and Valleys

By Thomas Hauser: An athlete’s life is characterized by peaks and valleys. When Sergio Martinez was 17 years old, he played forward in the number seven slot for a team called “Defensoris” in a junior amateur football (soccer) league in the province of Buenos Aires. Martinez-Chavez: Peaks and Valleys
Pacquiao-Bradley in Perspective

Pacquiao-Bradley in Perspective

By Thomas Hauser: A wave of outrage has swept over the boxing community with regard to the scoring of the June 9th fight between Manny Pacquiao and Tim Bradley. The overwhelming majority of fans, writers, and commentators who watched the fight thought that Pacquiao was a clear winner. Pacquiao-Bradley in Perspective
Chad Dawson: The Champion

Chad Dawson: The Champion

By Thomas Hauser: Drama is keyed to the personal lives of the participants. Regardless of what the rest of the world thought, the April 28th rematch between Chad Dawson and Bernard Hopkins at Boardwalk Hall in Atlantic City was high drama for Dawson and everyone who cares about him. Chad Dawson: The Champion
How HBO Lost Manny Pacquiao

How HBO Lost Manny Pacquiao

By Thomas Hauser: Manny Pacquiao is going to Showtime. On January 20th, Top Rank (Pacquiao’s promoter), Showtime, and CBS put the finishing touches on a three-way contract that calls for the May 7th fight between boxing’s reigning pound-for-pound king and Shane Mosley to be televised on Showtime Pay-Per-View. How HBO Lost Manny Pacquiao
Martinez-Williams II: The Punch

Martinez-Williams II: The Punch

By Thomas Hauser: Boxing is a hunger sport. All fighters start at the bottom. A rare few make it to the top. Sergio Martinez was born into poverty. Sports were his way out of the Argentinean ghetto. He was a talented soccer player and cyclist (his first two chosen sports). But his skills in those disciplines were short of world-class. Martinez-Williams II: The Punch
Manny Pacquiao: The People’s Champion

Manny Pacquiao: The People’s Champion

By Thomas Hauser: Outside the ring, fully clothed, Manny Pacquiao looks almost delicate and vulnerable. The first reaction that many people have on meeting him is surprise that he’s so small. His voice is soft. There’s a gentle quality about him. Manny Pacquiao: The People’s Champion
HBO and the State of Boxing – Part Three

HBO and the State of Boxing – Part Three

By Thomas Hauser: “One of the things I hear all the time now,” says Ross Greenburg, “is that everyone’s problems seem to be HBO’s fault. That’s getting tiring for us. Most of what happens in boxing is beyond our control.” One of boxing’s problems in 2010 is that the top promoters are fighting each other more often than the top fighters are fighting each other. The issues that HBO faces today are playing out against an increasingly ugly war between Golden Boy and Top Rank. HBO and the State of Boxing – Part Three
HBO and the State of Boxing – Part Two

HBO and the State of Boxing – Part Two

By Thomas Hauser: Despite its difficulties, HBO remains the dominant force in boxing today because of the size of its checkbook. But no financial transaction takes place in a vacuum. For every pile of money somewhere, there’s a larger pile somewhere else. When two financial powers interact and one helps the other, it can skew the balance of power in an industry. Nothing that HBO has done over the past few years has shaped boxing as much as its strategic alliance with Golden Boy Promotions. HBO and the State of Boxing – Part Two
HBO and the State of Boxing – Part One

HBO and the State of Boxing – Part One

By Thomas Hauser: There was a time when the sweet science was governed by the axiom, “As the heavyweight division goes, so goes boxing.” Now, in the United States, the rule of thumb is, “As HBO goes, so goes boxing.” HBO and the State of Boxing – Part One
Floyd Mayweather Jr: When is Enough?

Floyd Mayweather Jr: When is Enough?

By Thomas Hauser: Manny Pacquiao isn’t given to trash-talking. He rarely says a bad word about anyone and is particularly careful when talking about other boxers. Thus, it was significant when Pacquiao said recently, “[Floyd] Mayweather thinks he’s better than anybody else. In the ring, it’s good for a fighter to think that way, to have confidence. But Mayweather thinks that way about other people outside of boxing. I don’t like that.” Floyd Mayweather Jr: When is Enough?
Rocky Marciano Revisited – Part Two

Rocky Marciano Revisited – Part Two

By Thomas Hauser: History’s most celebrated heavyweight champions reflected the eras in which they reigned. Jack Dempsey personified the Roaring ’20s. Joe Louis was perfectly juxtaposed with the trials of The Great Depression and World War II. Muhammad Ali was inextricably intertwined with the turmoil of the 1960s. Rocky Marciano Revisited – Part Two
Rocky Marciano Revisited – Part One

Rocky Marciano Revisited – Part One

By Thomas Hauser: Six decades ago, Rocky Marciano was on the verge of a celebrated reign at a time when the heavyweight championship of the world was the most exalted title in sports. Rocky Marciano Revisited – Part One
More Flights of Fantasy

More Flights of Fantasy

By Thomas Hauser: Oscar De La Hoya is planning to fight again. After a period of reflection following his 2008 knockout loss at the hands of Manny Pacquiao, boxing’s Golden Boy will enter the ring on November 20th, one week after the proposed bout between Pacquiao and Antonio Margarito. More Flights of Fantasy
Antonio Margarito and the Handwrap Issue

Antonio Margarito and the Handwrap Issue

By Thomas Hauser: A fighter’s fists are his weapons. Tampering with a fighter’s gloved fists is one of the worst offenses imaginable in boxing. It subverts the notion of a fair fight and puts the opposing fighter at exponentially greater risk of serious injury or death. Antonio Margarito and the Handwrap Issue
My 84-Year-Old Mother Meets . . .

My 84-Year-Old Mother Meets . . .

By Thomas Hauser: Three years ago, I brought my mother to a press conference at Madison Square Garden to meet Don King. Then I posted an article on SecondsOut entitled (appropriately enough) “My 81-Year-Old Mother Meets Don King.” My 84-Year-Old Mother Meets . . .
Flights of Fantasy

Flights of Fantasy

By Thomas Hauser: The World Boxing Council announced this week that it is withdrawing recognition of 160-pound champion Sergio Martinez and 147-pound champion Andre Berto because of the conduct of their promoter, Lou DiBella. Flights of Fantasy
Chavez-Duddy: A Fighting Heart Isn’t Enough

Chavez-Duddy: A Fighting Heart Isn’t Enough

By Thomas Hauser: John Duddy sat in the “green room” at The Alamodome in San Antonio on the evening of June 26th. Before the night was done, eight thousand fans would watch him do battle. Hundreds of thousands more would see him on television. Few people have an audience of that magnitude at any time in their life. Chavez-Duddy: A Fighting Heart Isn’t Enough
Todd DuBoef and the Future of Boxing

Todd DuBoef and the Future of Boxing

By Thomas Hauser: There were whispers when Todd DuBoef started work at Top Rank in 1993. “Todd is a spoiled rich kid . . . Todd is Bob Arum’s valet . . . The only reason Todd has a job at Top Rank is that Arum married Todd’s mother.” That was then. Todd DuBoef and the Future of Boxing
An Appalling End to Foreman-Cotto

An Appalling End to Foreman-Cotto

By Thomas Hauser: QUESTION FOR BOXING REFEREES: A fighter collapses when his knee gives way during the seventh round of a twelve-round fight. When he rises to his feet, he’s in obvious pain and can’t move properly or put weight on the leg. The fighter collapses several more times. His chief second advises the referee that he wants the fight to be stopped. The fighter wants to continue. The referee should? An Appalling End to Foreman-Cotto
Why ?

Why ?

HBO paid a US$750,000 license fee for Victor Ortiz vs. Nate Campbell. We already know, “Who, what, how, when, and where?” Thomas Hauser asks “Why?” Why ?
Khan-Malignaggi: A Fighter’s Code

Khan-Malignaggi: A Fighter’s Code

By Thomas Hauser: Paulie Malignaggi sat on a folding chair in his dressing room one floor above The Theater at Madison Square Garden. He’d just been stopped in the eleventh round of his bid to wrest the WBA 140-pound title from Amir Khan. There had been no knockdowns. Paulie was on his feet when referee Steve Smoger intervened to save him from further punishment. Khan-Malignaggi: A Fighter’s Code
The Myth and the Reality of Floyd Mayweather Jr

The Myth and the Reality of Floyd Mayweather Jr

By Thomas Hauser: In today’s society, Patrick Kehoe observes, “hyperbole tends to replicate itself as an electronic echo, transmitting the desired information as truth logged into infinite memory. Just keep talking, and something aggrandizing will affix to the culture at large.” One might cite Floyd Mayweather Jr in support of that theory. The Myth and the Reality of Floyd Mayweather Jr
Kelly Pavlik and the Hard Road of Boxing

Kelly Pavlik and the Hard Road of Boxing

By Thomas Hauser: Most professional fighters have struggled with demons. That’s one of the things that impelled them to become fighters. They’re faced with the constant reality of being punched by men trained in the art of hurting. And if a fighter becomes The Man, it seems as though everyone wants a piece of him. Kelly Pavlik and the Hard Road of Boxing
Notes and Nuggets

Notes and Nuggets

By Thomas Hauser: When a fighter is in the ring, he hits and gets hit. But when a fighter and writer interact, almost always, the fighter is on the receiving end of the questions. What would it be like if the tables were turned? In search of an answer, I asked seven fighters what questions they’d like to put to the men and women who write about them. Notes and Nuggets
Manny Pacquiao and the Essence of Boxing

Manny Pacquiao and the Essence of Boxing

Once again, this time in Dallas, Thomas Hauser was in Manny Pacquaio’s dressing room as boxing’s pound-for-champion prepared for battle. Click on Pacquaio’s photo or the headline above for Hauser’s exclusive report on the world’s most exciting fighter. Manny Pacquiao and the Essence of Boxing
Hopkins-Jones II: Better Never Than Late

Hopkins-Jones II: Better Never Than Late

By Thomas Hauser: This is a column I’d rather not write. But I chronicle the contemporary boxing scene, and I’d be less than honest if I didn’t write it. Hopkins-Jones II: Better Never Than Late
Notes and Nuggets

Notes and Nuggets

By Thomas Hauser: Don Elbaum telephoned last week to spread a message: Boxing fans should no longer be depressed about the demise of Pacquiao-Mayweather. A new mega-fight is on the horizon. Notes and Nuggets
Mayweather-Pacquiao, PEDs, and Boxing

Mayweather-Pacquiao, PEDs, and Boxing

By Thomas Hauser: Two days before Manny Pacquiao fought Miguel Cotto, I talked with Alex Ariza, who has been Pacquiao’s strength and conditioning coach since early 2008. When I asked what it was like to work with an athlete of Manny’s caliber, Ariza shook his head in wonder. Mayweather-Pacquiao, PEDs, and Boxing
"Did Barbra Streisand Whup Sonny Liston?"

"Did Barbra Streisand Whup Sonny Liston?"

By Thomas Hauser: Late last year, the Secret Service was embarrassed by the revelation that an uninvited couple had worked their way past security checkpoints and been photographed with Barack Obama at a White House state dinner honoring the Prime Minister of India. Been there, done that. Sort of. "Did Barbra Streisand Whup Sonny Liston?"
Notes and Nuggets

Notes and Nuggets

By Thomas Hauser: A tip of the hat to two men who deserve it. Whenever there’s a big fight at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas, Nathan Lee and La Mont Starks can be found sitting at a desk outside the media center. Notes and Nuggets
Holiday Reading: 2009

Holiday Reading: 2009

By Thomas Hauser: Each year during the holiday season, I publish a “top forty” list of what I consider to be the best books on boxing. That list, updated to accommodate recently published titles, follows. Some of these books are now out of print. But with the proliferation of online services like Abebooks.com and Amazon.com, all of them can be found. Holiday Reading: 2009
Boxing Gives Thanks for Manny Pacquiao

Boxing Gives Thanks for Manny Pacquiao

By Thomas Hauser: Thanksgiving and Christmas came early for boxing this year. The November 14th mega-match between Manny Pacquiao and Miguel Cotto was the biggest and most important fight of 2009. Think of it as a holiday festival with Pacquiao in the role of Santa Claus. Or maybe Manny is better characterized as a non-stop Energizer Easter Bunny, whose fists exploded like Fourth of July fireworks and turned Cotto’s face into a gruesome Halloween mask. Boxing Gives Thanks for Manny Pacquiao
Ricardo Jimenez

Ricardo Jimenez

By Thomas Hauser: Another big fight week is here. All eyes are about to focus on Manny Pacquiao and Miguel Cotto. Through it all, a soft-spoken man with a round face and neatly-groomed walrus mustache will be in the background, quietly doing his job. Ricardo Jimenez
Mike Tyson and Other Notes

Mike Tyson and Other Notes

By Thomas Hauser: Mike Tyson has always been a compelling presence. Many observers of the boxing scene think that, early in his career, he was a great fighter. Others (such as Dave Anderson, who called Tyson “a thug who got lucky”) take a contrary view. What’s beyond debate is that Tyson, like Muhammad Ali and Joe Louis before him, entered the national psyche. Everyone knew who he was and everyone had an opinion about him. Mike Tyson and Other Notes
The New York Times and Boxing

The New York Times and Boxing

By Thomas Hauser: There was a time when big fights were chronicled in the New York Times with banner headlines in large type that stretched across the front page. Those days are long gone. Newspapers across the country are abandoning the sweet science. Like the sport itself, writing about boxing is fading from view. But the Times is America’s newspaper of record. Being slighted by the fabled “gray lady of journalism” cuts particularly deep. The New York Times and Boxing
HBO and Boxing: At a Crossroads

HBO and Boxing: At a Crossroads

By Thomas Hauser: HBO and boxing are at a crossroads. The first draft of the network’s overall budget for 2010 was presented in July. It called for a US$15,000,000 reduction for HBO Sports; a cut in excess of twenty percent. Then, during the first week of September, Michael Lombardo (president of HBO’s programming group and West Coast operations) further signaled senior management’s displeasure with the status quo. HBO and Boxing: At a Crossroads
Tina Meets Manny

Tina Meets Manny

By Thomas Hauser: When the bell rings, Manny Pacquiao’s eyes turn to burning coals. His ring skills have made him what Steve Kim calls “the Filipino version of Michael Jordan, Babe Ruth, and the Beatles.” Pacquiao carried the Filipino flag at the opening ceremony for the 2008 Beijing Olympics. He’s the only Filipino boxer to appear on a postage stamp. Earlier this year, Time Magazine listed him among its “100 most influential people” in the world. Tina Meets Manny
Yuri Foreman: A Spiritual Journey

Yuri Foreman: A Spiritual Journey

By Thomas Hauser: On November 14th, on the pay-per-view undercard of the mega-fight between Manny Pacquiao and Miguel Cotto, 29-year-old Yuri Foreman will challenge Daniel Santos for the World Boxing Association 154-pound crown. Yuri Foreman: A Spiritual Journey
Texas is Shameless

Texas is Shameless

By Thomas Hauser: In August 2007, Paulie Malignaggi traveled to Las Vegas as a representative of Everlast at the “Magic” fashion show. Moments after his return flight to New York landed, he was taking his carry-on bag from the overhead luggage bin when another passenger recognized him. “Hey, Paulie,” the man said. “I love you. You’re a great fighter. Don’t worry; Someday, you’ll win a title.” Texas is Shameless
Sugar Ray Robinson Revisited – Part Two

Sugar Ray Robinson Revisited – Part Two

By Thomas Hauser: Sugar Ray Robinson’s knockout victory over Jake LaMotta captured the imagination of America. Baseball and boxing were the country’s two national sports. Robinson had now entered the ring for 124 fights, losing once. This was his fifth victory over the man who’d defeated him. And thanks to television, thirty million people had witnessed him in his prime. He was handsome, telegenic, and lethal. Sugar Ray Robinson Revisited – Part Two
Sugar Ray Robinson Revisited – Part One

Sugar Ray Robinson Revisited – Part One

By Thomas Hauser: Sugar Ray Robinson is the gold standard against which all fighters are judged. “He had everything,” legendary trainer Eddie Futch said after Robinson died. “Boxing skills, punching power, a great chin, mental strength. There was nothing he couldn’t do. He knew almost everything there was to know about how to box. When Ray was in his prime, he owned the ring like no fighter before or since.” Sugar Ray Robinson Revisited – Part One
Jessica Goes to the Fights

Jessica Goes to the Fights

By Thomas Hauser: Jessica won my heart completely, totally, and without reservation when she was three years old. I was forty-two at the time. My brother, Jim, had come east from Oregon, where he lived with his wife and daughters (Cathy and Jessica). They were visiting my parents, who lived in the suburbs of New York. Cathy was seven and too sophisticated for the game that Jessica and I were playing. Jessica Goes to the Fights
Notes and Nuggets

Notes and Nuggets

By Thomas Hauser: Like most boxing writers, I receive an endless stream of press releases. Recently, one caught my eye. It was for a celebrity boxing event to be held in Pennsylvania on July 24th. Notes and Nuggets
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