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26 SEPTEMBER 2018

 

Thomas Hauser is the author of 34 books including 'Muhammad Ali: His Life And Times'. In 2005, he was honored by the Boxing Writers Association of America, which bestowed the Nat Fleischer Award for career excellence in boxing journalism upon him. He was the first Internet writer ever to receive the honor. Thomas describes writing for Secondsout.com as a chance to 'explore new frontiers and deliver cutting-edge material to website readers'. His next book - ‘The Greatest Sport of All' - will be published by the University of Arkansas Press later this year.

 

Use the search box below to reference Hauser's entire archive from 2001 to date on Secondsout.





Features Articles
51 - 100 of 208   Articles
The Lesson of Ortiz-Maidana

The Lesson of Ortiz-Maidana

By Thomas Hauser: On June 27th, HBO televised what was supposed to be Victor Ortiz’s coronation as the WBA “interim junior-welterweight champion of the world.” The 22-year-old Ortiz has been groomed for stardom and still might make it there someday. But at a point in his career when the competition should have been stepped up to harden him for a championship run, he was put in soft. The Lesson of Ortiz-Maidana
The Oddest Couple

The Oddest Couple

By Thomas Hauser: Barney Frank has been in Congress since 1981 and is chairman of the House of Representatives Financial Services Committee. That makes him one of the most powerful people in government. His career is also notable because, in 1987, he was only the second member of Congress to openly acknowledge being gay. What does Barney Frank have to do with boxing? The Oddest Couple
Arthur Curry: His Life and Legacy

Arthur Curry: His Life and Legacy

By Thomas Hauser: A lot of people liked Arthur Curry. Almost everyone else loved him. Artie’s mind was filled with wonderful thoughts and his feelings were founded on love. He was about giving. He enjoyed doing things for people and took care to never hurt anyone. He was a man of integrity who radiated truth. He spoke his mind and didn’t hide his feelings. “Being real,” he called it. But he was always kind. Arthur Curry: His Life and Legacy
Seth Abraham: Then and Now

Seth Abraham: Then and Now

By Thomas Hauser: HBO is the dominant player in boxing today. It wasn’t always that way. In the mid-1980s, the broadcast television networks (ABC, CBS, and NBC) ruled the ring. The man most responsible for upending that hierarchy was Seth Abraham, the architect of HBO’s boxing program. Seth Abraham: Then and Now
Manny Pacquiao: A Fighter for the Ages

Manny Pacquiao: A Fighter for the Ages

By Thomas Hauser: On May 2nd, Manny Pacquiao and Ricky Hatton engaged in battle for the right to be called boxing’s “pound-for-pound” champion. Pacquiao and Hatton have aggressive relentless ring styles. They are two of the most exciting fighters in the world. Each man has stayed close to his roots, geographically and in terms of character. Both have special meaning to their constituents. No two fighters are more loved in their native lands. Manny Pacquiao: A Fighter for the Ages
Rediscovering Joe Frazier Through Dave Wolf’s Eyes

Rediscovering Joe Frazier Through Dave Wolf’s Eyes

By Thomas Hauser: This is the first in a series of articles that will appear over time. Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier fought three fights that are the pyramids of boxing. Dave Wolf was in the Frazier camp for each of them. Dave was a gifted writer who later gained recognition as the manager of Ray Mancini and Donny Lalonde. He died last December. Rediscovering Joe Frazier Through Dave Wolf’s Eyes
Danny Jacobs: “The Golden Child”

Danny Jacobs: “The Golden Child”

By Thomas Hauser: Danny Jacobs is being groomed for stardom. Outside the ring, Jacobs is easy-going with a natural, almost disarming, quality about him. He likes to talk. “And I love to cook,” he offers. “Chicken, pasta, different sauces. Bread pudding is my favorite. I make it well.” He’s also a talented young fighter, who says without false modesty, “I’m capable of being the best in the world. I can make a big mark in this game.” Danny Jacobs: “The Golden Child”
Will Rosinsky: A Fighter with Options

Will Rosinsky: A Fighter with Options

By Thomas Hauser: There was a time when New York City was a breeding ground for elite fighters. Those days are long gone, but prospects still surface in the Big Apple. Will Rosinsky is one of them. Will Rosinsky: A Fighter with Options
Hero

Hero

By Thomas Hauser: In the past, I’ve recounted the memories of boxing notables who spoke fondly of their greatest moment in a sport other than boxing. Since then, I’ve received several emails asking what my own “moment in the sun” was. Here goes: Hero
More Great Moments in Sports

More Great Moments in Sports

By Thomas Hauser: In the past, I’ve recounted the memories of fighters who spoke fondly of their greatest moment in a sport other than boxing. The recollections of some notable non-combatants follow: More Great Moments in Sports
Top Rank Goes It Alone

Top Rank Goes It Alone

By Thomas Hauser

Don’t get carried away by the title of this article. It would be a stretch to liken Bob Arum to Gary Cooper in High Noon. But in recent weeks, there has been talk of a new economic model in boxing. And Arum, in tandem with Todd DuBoef (his stepson and the president of Top Rank) might be charting a path out of the wilderness that the sweet science has wandered through in recent years. Top Rank Goes It Alone
A Diamante in the Rough

A Diamante in the Rough

By Thomas Hauser

One night next month, moments before the opening bell, ring announcer David Diamante will take the microphone for one of the many fight cards he works in the New York metropolitan area. Diamante is tall and slender with a gaunt face, aquiline nose, and piercing blue eyes. His voice is a gift and he uses it well. A Diamante in the Rough
The Truth about John Duddy

The Truth about John Duddy

By Thomas Hauser

A fighter sacrifices. He tortures his body; he hardens his mind. And all the while, he’s surrounded by people, some of whom give him their heart and soul while others view him as prey. Depending on those associations, the business of boxing can be profitable for a fighter or worse than any physical beating that he suffers. John Duddy is learning that hard lesson now. The Truth about John Duddy
Memorandum for Ross Greenburg: HBO 2009

Memorandum for Ross Greenburg: HBO 2009

By Thomas Hauser

Hi. It’s me again.

Yeah; I figured that would make you happy.

Anyway; HBO seems to be struggling with its boxing programming. Your ratings for boxing last year looked like polls tracking the national approval rating for George Bush’s handling of the economy. So I thought I’d pass along a few thoughts. Memorandum for Ross Greenburg: HBO 2009
Dave Wolf: A Remembrance

Dave Wolf: A Remembrance

By Thomas Hauser

I’ve lost a good friend. Dave Wolf died in his sleep last night.

When I say “good friend,” I mean it. Dave Wolf: A Remembrance
A Moment with Joe Frazier

A Moment with Joe Frazier

By Thomas Hauser

One of the joys in covering a big fight is that I never know what “extras” fight night will bring. Earlier this year, I was in the press room at Boardwalk Hall in Atlantic City readying for Kelly Pavlik vs. Bernard Hopkins when Joe Frazier came in. A Moment with Joe Frazier
De La Hoya-Pacquiao and the Business of Boxing

De La Hoya-Pacquiao and the Business of Boxing

By Thomas Hauser

It’s hard to know how future generations will evaluate Oscar De La Hoya.

Oscar is more than a name. He was once a very good fighter, but that time has come and gone. He has lost four of his last seven fights. One can argue that he hasn’t beaten an elite opponent since a split-decision victory over Ike Quartey on February 13, 1999. De La Hoya-Pacquiao and the Business of Boxing
Holiday Reading: 2008

Holiday Reading: 2008

By Thomas Hauser

Each year during the holiday season, I publish a “top forty” list of what I consider to be the best books on boxing. That list, updated to accommodate recently published titles, follows. Some of these books are now out of print. But with the proliferation of online services like Abebooks.com and Amazon.com, all of them can be found. Holiday Reading: 2008
Hatton-Malignaggi: The End of a Dream

Hatton-Malignaggi: The End of a Dream

By Thomas Hauser

In today’s era of devalued titles, it’s not enough to be a “champion.” To be fully recognized and make big money, a fighter has to be a star. Hatton-Malignaggi: The End of a Dream
Joe Calzaghe vs. Roy Jones Jr

Joe Calzaghe vs. Roy Jones Jr

By Thomas Hauser

The main arena at Madison Square Garden is a nice place to make history. On November 8th, Joe Calzaghe and Roy Jones Jr did just that, although the results were far more gratifying to Calzaghe. Joe Calzaghe vs. Roy Jones Jr
Anthony Catanzaro and Chris Santos

Anthony Catanzaro and Chris Santos

By Thomas Hauser

When Paulie Malignaggi steps into the ring to face Ricky Hatton on November 22nd, two fans with unique perspectives will be at ringside. Anthony Catanzaro and Chris Santos are part owners of restaurants that are as different as the styles of the fighters they’ll be watching in Las Vegas. But they share a passion for the sweet science and for Paulie. Anthony Catanzaro and Chris Santos
Pavlik-Hopkins: Boxing is a Cruel Teacher

Pavlik-Hopkins: Boxing is a Cruel Teacher

By Thomas Hauser

Boxing has its own version of The Golden Rule: “Do unto to others as they would do unto you.” On October 18th, Kelly Pavlik entered the ring at Boardwalk Hall in Atlantic City intent upon scoring a decisive victory over Bernard Hopkins. He didn’t have to knock Hopkins out. But he was committed to fashioning a triumph that left no doubt. “I want everybody to know that I beat Hopkins,” Pavlik said. “And I want Bernard to know that I beat him too.” Pavlik-Hopkins: Boxing is a Cruel Teacher
Sarah Palin Talks Boxing

Sarah Palin Talks Boxing

By Thomas Hauser

Sarah Palin has avoided open-ended interviews with the media since her nomination at the Republican National Convention last month. But she was willing to sit down for an extended conversation with Thomas Hauser on the subject of boxing on the condition that an unedited transcript of the interview appear on SecondsOut.com. Sarah Palin Talks Boxing
More Important Than Boxing: 2008

More Important Than Boxing: 2008

By Thomas Hauser

My first book served as the basis for a feature film starring Jack Lemmon and Sissy Spacek. Missing told the true-life story of an American named Charles Horman, who was killed by the Chilean military in the aftermath of the 1973 coup that toppled Chilean president Salvador Allende. One night, I asked Charles’s mother what she thought was the most important message I could convey in the book. Her answer has always stayed with me. More Important Than Boxing: 2008
The Vice Presidential Sweepstakes

The Vice Presidential Sweepstakes

By Thomas Hauser

Most people don’t know it, but Republican Party insiders say that Sarah Palin was the “safe” choice as John McCain’s running mate. Some McCain strategists opposed her selection on grounds that America isn’t ready for a vice president who names her children "Track, Bristol, Willow, Piper and Trig." But in the end, the half-baked half-term Alaska governor was a safer pick than the alternatives. The Vice Presidential Sweepstakes
Floyd’s World

Floyd’s World

By Thomas Hauser
The May 5th fight between Oscar De La Hoya and Floyd Mayweather Jr might turn out to be the largest-grossing fight in the history of boxing. Over the next few months, thousands of articles will be written about the combatants. Their respective pysches will be thoroughly explored. I don’t claim intimate knowledge of either man, but one experience with Mayweather stands out in my mind. Floyd’s World

HBO Boxing: The Challenge

By Thomas Hauser
Boxing is struggling, and 2007 will bring new challenges for the sport. Showtime has publicly announced its intention to televise mixed martial arts. Meanwhile, HBO is committed to televising three UFC shows during the coming year with an option for three more. HBO's current plan is to air the shows at midnight on dates still to be determined. No matter how these telecasts are packaged, ultimately they will compete with boxing. HBO Boxing: The Challenge

Jermain Taylor: The Homecoming

By Thomas Hauser
Some fighters have their hometown behind them. Jermain Taylor has an entire state.

Arkansas isn't known for boxing. Sonny Liston, Tommy Freeman, and Taylor are the only undisputed world champions to have been born there. But unlike the other three, Jermain has lived his entire life in Razorback territory. "Arkansas is my home," he says. Jermain Taylor: The Homecoming

Courage

By Thomas Hauser
"Courage," Irish scholar C. S. Lewis wrote, "is every virtue at the testing point." But courage has special meaning for professional boxers. Courage

Holiday Reading: 2006

By Thomas Hauser
Each year during the holiday season, I publish a list of what I consider to be the best books on the sweet science. That list, updated with recently published titles, follows. Some of these books are now out of print. But with the proliferation of online services like Abebooks.com, Alibris.com, and Amazon.com, all of them can be found. Holiday Reading: 2006

The Heavyweights

By Thomas Hauser
On June 8, 2002, Lennox Lewis knocked out Mike Tyson in Memphis. Since then, there has been only one real heavyweight championship fight. That was Lewis's stoppage of Vitali Klitschko on June 21, 2003. The Heavyweights

More Important Than Boxing

By Thomas Hauser
I received an email recently from a reader complaining about an article that I wrote twenty-one months ago. The article was entitled "Jack Newfield and George Bush" and recounted my final conversation with Jack Newfield, who died of cancer in December 2004. More Important Than Boxing

The Colossus of Clones

By Thomas Hauser
Boxing is the world's hardest sport and also the world's hardest business. Earlier this month, Nikolai Valuev and Thomas Adamek defended their titles at the Allstate Arena in Rosemont, Illinois. Tucked away on the undercard in an off-television bout was a man who, sixteen months ago, stood at the center of the boxing universe. The Colossus of Clones

Nikolai Valuev: More Than Meets The Eye

By Thomas Hauser
Let's start with some thoughts from Nikolai Valuev himself. He was born in Leningrad (now St. Petersburg) on August 21, 1973. He's the World Boxing Association heavyweight champion, stands 7-feet-2-inches tall, weighs 328 pounds, and has 45 wins in 45 fights. Nikolai Valuev: More Than Meets The Eye
The Continuing Education of Ireland’s John Duddy

The Continuing Education of Ireland’s John Duddy

By Thomas Hauser
On September 29th, John Duddy fought Yory Boy Campas at the Theater at Madison Square Garden. The fight was made by Team Duddy with the expectation that it would be the next step up the ladder for the popular Irish middleweight. Instead, it became a harrowing journey and a defining fight in ways that were both good and bad. The Continuing Education of Ireland’s John Duddy

Steve Farhood

By Thomas Hauser
"I was clearly a mistake." Those are Steve Farhood's first words when asked to provide biographical data about himself. "I'm the last of four children," he elaborates. "And my parents were divorced one month before I was born."

Farhood might have been a mistake, but he doesn't make many of them. Over the course of 28 years in boxing, he has fashioned a well-deserved reputation for integrity and competence. Steve Farhood

Hey, Bernard; Go Back To School

By Thomas Hauser
Millions of students will be going back to school this week, and many of them will be asked to write the time-honored essay, "What I Did On My Summer Vacation". Thus, it's worth checking in with one of boxing's finest students -- Bernard Hopkins, who retired from the sweet science this year following a unanimous decision triumph over Antonio Tarver. Hey, Bernard; Go Back To School

Tim Smith

By Thomas Hauser
Sara Lee cakes once had a promotional jingle that went, "Everybody doesn't like something; but nobody doesn't like Sara Lee."

Similarly, everybody doesn't like someone; but nobody doesn't like Tim Smith. Tim Smith

Don King At 75

By Thomas Hauser

There are times when it's hard to like Don King. And there are times when it's hard to dislike him.

King is unique; a man of foresight, vision, and (some say) foul play. Hard-working, brilliant, charismatic; he's one of the most complex people ever to grace the American scene. His rise in the sweet science is almost as remarkable as Muhammad Ali's. He is an icon and a legend in his own time. Don King At 75

Boxing After Dark on HBO

By Thomas Hauser
Boxing After Dark made its debut on February 3, 1996. Through July 29th of this year, it has been home to 157 fights.

The idea behind the original Boxing After Dark series was to give the public competitive fights between exciting young fighters on the rise. But on occasion, the show was a vehicle of accommodation. Instead putting "stars of the future" in competitive bouts, HBO opted at times for mismatches to showcase a particular fighter. Boxing After Dark on HBO

Lee Samuels and Alan Hopper

By Thomas Hauser
Bob Arum and Don King aren't ordinary people. They're brilliant and demanding, focused and driven; admired in some circles and disliked in others. They've dominated the sweet science for longer than most of today's fighters have been alive. And each of them relies on a savvy director of public relations to help achieve his goals. Lee Samuels and Alan Hopper

Roy Jones In Idaho

By Thomas Hauser
When Roy Jones was young, he glowed. There was an aura about him and words came out of his mouth like bursts of machine-gun fire. The glow is gone now. Roy's face looks old for his 37 years and there's a bit of cotton in his voice. Roy Jones In Idaho

Nevada's "Safety Committee" Report

By Thomas Hauser
At long last, the Nevada State Athletic Commission's Advisory Committee on Boxer Health and Safety has issued its report. Many of the recommendations simply call for further study of problems or suggest that the NSAC ask the state legislature for additional funds to address an issue. Nevada's "Safety Committee" Report

Richard Schaefer and The Golden Boy Empire

By Thomas Hauser
Richard Schaefer is an interesting man. Soft-spoken, polite, smart with old-world sensibilities. Like his father, he has a passion for collecting classic Swiss stamps (those from 1848 through 1875, when the postal system in Switzerland changed). He's fluent in Swiss German (his native language), German, French, and English, and also speaks a bit of Spanish. Richard Schaefer and The Golden Boy Empire

Legacy Fights: Hopkins-Tarver and Taylor-Wright

By Thomas Hauser
Fights that shape a fighter's legacy are rare in boxing.

Earlier this month, four elite fighters stepped into the ring in two fights on back-to-back weekends. On June 10th, Bernard Hopkins moved up in weight to challenge Antonio Tarver for the right to be called the best light-heavyweight in the world. Eight days later, Jermain Taylor defended his middleweight championship against Winky Wright. Legacy Fights: Hopkins-Tarver and Taylor-Wright

The Matchmakers

By Thomas Hauser

"Matchmaker, matchmaker, make me a match,
Find me a find, catch me a catch
Matchmaker, matchmaker, look through your book,
And make me a perfect match."


Lyrics by Shelson Harnick, Fiddler on the Roof The Matchmakers

George Ward: The Inspector

By Thomas Hauser
Go to a fight. Watch each corner between rounds. If the fight is being properly regulated, someone will be standing on the ring apron just outside the ropes, staring intently at the interplay between the fighter, his trainer, and anyone else who's involved. That observer is an inspector. George Ward: The Inspector

Oscar and Ricky: Blue Chip and Blue Collar

By Thomas Hauser
Oscar De La Hoya and Ricky Hatton are boxing's poster boys on either side of the Atlantic Ocean. Earlier this month, they were showcased on consecutive weekends in major fights. And to draw them closer in the public mind, HBO televised a rerun of De La Hoya's May 6th fight with Ricardo Mayorga as the lead-in to a live telecast of Hatton's May 13th bout against Luis Collazo. Oscar and Ricky: Blue Chip and Blue Collar

Dan Rafael

By Thomas Hauser

"A sportswriter," Jimmy Cannon once wrote, "is entombed in a prolonged boyhood." If Cannon were alive today, he might cite Dan Rafael to prove his point.

Rafael is the boxing writer for ESPN.com. He writes breaking news, feature stories, a weekly notebook, and Monday wrap-up. He also answers questions during online chats and compiles rankings. Reading his work enables fans to keep current in the sweet science. Dan Rafael

Who's Betting What On The Fights?

By Thomas Hauser

Boxing has a problem; a big one. Think of it as a monster that's hiding under the bed. Eventually, the monster is going to come out and take a big chunk out of boxing.

Fighters, trainers, managers, promoters, even government regulators, can legally bet on fights. They can also bet on fights that they're involved with. Who's Betting What On The Fights?
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