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23 MARCH 2017

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FULL Report: Jones Jr Defeats Gunn


By Jeff.J.Jowett at ringside: A bizarre "one-off" promotion rivaling WWF was presented on 2/17/17 in the unlikely locale of Wilmington, DE. It had star power and not much else. But that was all it needed. Roy Jones, 199, Pensacola, 65-9 (47), faced Bobby Gunn, 197 1/2, Niagara Falls, Ont, 21-7-1 (18), in a scheduled 12, of course for some meaningless "world" title. Jones wouldn’t and Gunn couldn’t. Action was sparse, but the names held the overflow crowd in rapt attention. Jones drifted languidly around the ring taking potshots enough to maintain complete control. The powerful and plodding Gunn’s only chance was to pin Roy to the ropes and manhandle him. But Bobby made only sparing attempts, and when he did, Roy skilfully tied him up while taking advantage of the break in movement to chat merrily with ringsiders.
After four relatively tame rounds, Jones jolted the crowd alive with some serious rights in the fifth. Gunn cornered Roy early in the sixth but was unable to turn it to any advantage. Roy smothered him and slipped away.
Nothing much happened through the seventh until late in the round. Then the lid flew off! Jones fired an overhand right. Gunn broke to his right to duck the punch and ran his face directly into a crunching left hook that Roy brought up from below. Bobby did a jig to keep his legs under him as the crowd erupted. He was a target in a gallery, but instead of finishing him off, Jones stepped back, dropped his arms to his side, and talked to him, as if, "Oops, sorry, Bobby, didn’t mean to hurt you." The crowd roared but the bell rang shortly after. Bobby obliged at the start of the eighth by declining further combat. The official time of the TKO was 0:07. There were scattered boos, but not at the contest; at Gunn’s failure to keep it going.
Gunn commented, "I was enjoying him beating me up." That was believable! He added candidly, "I think he was taking it easy on me... I didn’t get knocked out. I went out on my shield like a man." Asked about the aging winner’s future, promoter David Feldman asked rhetorically, "Who are we to tell that guy he can’t go make a living?"


Jones Outguns Gunn
J. R. Jowett reporting far back from ringside: A bizarre "one-off" promotion rivaling WWF was presented on 2/17/17 in the unlikely locale of Wilmington, DE. It had star power and not much else. But that was all it needed. Roy Jones, 199, Pensacola, 65-9 (47), faced Bobby Gunn, 197 ½, Niagara Falls, ONT, 21-7-1 (18), in a scheduled 12, of course for some meaningless "world" title. Jones wouldn’t and Gunn couldn’t. Action was sparse, but the names held the overflow crowd in rapt attention. Jones drifted languidly around the ring taking potshots enough to maintain complete control. The powerful and plodding Gunn’s only chance was to pin Roy to the ropes and manhandle him. But Bobby made only sparing attempts, and when he did, Roy skillfully tied him up while taking advantage of the break in movement to chat merrily with ringsiders.
After four relatively tame rounds, Jones jolted the crowd alive with some serious rights in the fifth. Gunn cornered Roy early in the sixth but was unable to turn it to any advantage. Roy smothered him and slipped away. Nothing much happened through the seventh until late in the round. Then the lid flew off! Jones fired an overhand right. Gunn broke to his right to duck the punch and ran his face directly into a crunching left hook that Roy brought up from below. Bobby did a jig to keep his legs under him as the crowd erupted. He was a target in a gallery, but instead of finishing him off, Jones stepped back, dropped his arms to his side, and talked to him, as if, "Oops, sorry, Bobby, didn’t mean to hurt you." The crowd roared but the bell rang shortly after. Bobby obliged at the start of the eighth by declining further combat. The official time of the TKO was 0:07. There were scattered boos, but not at the contest; at Gunn’s failure to keep it going. Referee was Bill Clancy.
Gunn commented, "I was enjoying him beating me up." That was believable! He added candidly, "I think he was taking it easy on me... I didn’t get knocked out. I went out on my shield like a man." Questioned about the aging winner’s future, promoter David Feldman asked rhetorically, "Who are we to tell that guy he can’t go make a living?"


Was this a bad show? No. The Pay Per View customers may or may not have been happy, but for the turnaway crowd of some 2400 at the Chase Center, the magnitude outweighed the details. The show was poorly managed, with huge delays dragging it out until ring announcer Mark Fratto informed the house that it was tomorrow. But that’s nothing new. Live TV in some way or other negatively impacts every show for the in-house fans. It’s 100% for them, zero for the live crowd. Feldman Prom’ns teamed with Kings Prom’ns, Marshall Kauffman matchmaker, and fans enjoyed the upscale night out.
Even though it lasted less than a round, fans were also delighted with the scheduled 10 semi. A Kazakhstani pop star, if one can imagine that, warmed up the crowd with a lively performance as Kanat Islam, 154 ¼, fighting out of Pahokee, FL, 23-0 (19), took on Robson Assis, 154 ½, Salvador, Brazil, 16-4 (9). The stocky, fired-up favorite came out smoking with both hands out of a squared stance and the hapless southpaw Brazilian never got a chance to get set. Action was furious to begin, and then a clash of heads cut Islam’s right eye, forcing a brief check by the doctor and sending Kanat into an even higher gear. Assis was overwhelmed by a relentless barrage until a right sent him down. Referee Vic de Wysocki, “The Arthur Mercante of Delaware”, counted him out at 2:12.


Frankie De Alba, 130 ¼, Reading, now out of Allentown, 21-2-2 (9), dutifully scored a unanimous shutout of tricky survivor German Meraz, 129, Agua Prieta, MX, 55-42-1 (32), six. The southpaw favorite kept up a constant controlled pressure behind a long jab that pinned the shifty veteran just enough to put together combos and dominate the contest. Round six had the most action, as the underdog by then had nothing to lose and did more standing and trading.
Thankfully, the judges got it right in a dull six between Dagoberto Aguero, 118 ½, San Cristobal, DR, 11-0 (8), and Olimjon Nazarov, 119 ½, Tashkent, Uzbekistan, 14-5 (8). The stocky Nazarov stalked all night but couldn’t effectively penetrate the loose-limbed and mobile Dominican. Aguero circled wide and peppered the jab, but most fell harmlessly on the Uzbekistani’s tight guard. Nazarov tried only for payoff punches, but without effective penetration, most died on the end of the arc. There weren’t a lot of clean blows and most rounds were close.

 

Nonetheless, the Dominican fought his fight and kept Nazarov at bay to deserve the majority decision. Dorothea Perry scored 57-57, but Brian Costello had 58-56 and Mark D’Attilio 59-55 for Aguero.


It wasn’t pretty but fans loved it as their favorite, Joey Tiberi, returned to action. Tiberi, 139, Bear, DE, 14-2 (7), faced Bryan Timmons, 138 ¼, St. Joseph, MO, 5-9 (5), in a scheduled four. Tiberi was hardly sharp, and the first three rounds were awkward. The underdog twice went to the canvas from the momentum of his own missed haymakers. But all was right with the world in the final round when Timmons fell apart from body punches and could no longer stand up straight, clutching like his opponent was a lifeboat off the Titanic. Ref de Wysocki rightly stopped it, at 2:04.


A popular local attraction died on the vine as TV had forced it to be moved until after the main event and most fans had left the building. Lamont Singletary, 204 ¾, Dover, 8-1 (5), polished off Dan “Ba-Da Bing” Biddle, 214, Wilmington, 9-6 (5), with a crushing KO at 1:49 of the first of four. The aggressive “Ba-Da Bing” walked straight into a short right, wobbled, and incited Lamont to a furious two-hand attack that finally sent him crashing to the canvas. Biddle was down for some time and departed favoring his left arm, which was doubtless injured in the fall. Ref was de Wysocki. The contest was for the Delaware State Cruiser title and was more of a “championship” than the main event.


Women put on a lively scrap as Ikram Kerwat, 134, Frankfurt, Germany, 7-1 (5), took a dominant unanimous decision over Britain Hart, 130, Bedford, VA, 2-1 (2), in four two-minutes rounds. The stronger Kerwat took the fight to the willing Hart and battered her several times with a series of straight rights. Hart at times was in trouble but always fought her way out with determination.


The long day’s journey into night closed with a virtually meaningless four between Toronto’s Henry Stewart, 176 ½, 3-0 (1), and veteran opponent Martez Williamson, 190 ½, Alliance, OH, 2-16. The awkward underdog lurched in every direction at once and threw arcing windmill punches which were easy to avoid. The most that can be said for Stewart is that he was more focused and contained. Stewart got a majority decision, with Perry scoring 37-37(?) and the others 39-37.


The show was conducted under the Virginia commission, with Commissioner David Holland acting as timekeeper as well. He tolled the final 10 for the promoter’s father and former boxer and trainer Marty Feldman. Russell Peltz observed of Feldman, “I won’t say he was the best trainer in the world, but I will say there was no one better.”
In memory of K.O.J.O.




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