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30 OCTOBER 2014

 

My perspective on conditioning and training


By Paulie Ayala

My most important thing is to always stay in condition. Too often, I see fighters that lack consistency and discipline. I never stop my running, boxing, exercise, and nutrition. When there is no fight scheduled, I allow myself a few days a week of eating whatever I like. These are what I like to call my “cheat days.” For Main Event Fights, I allow 6-8 weeks of training.

Monday-Saturday

Run 4-6 miles

GYM

Speed ball

Hand mitts

Heavy bag

Double end bag

Jump rope

Abdominal Exercises

NUTRITION

High protein

Low carbs, but complex carbohydrates

No fried foods

Grilled an baked chicken or fish

Vitamins and supplements

1 gallon of water per day

WEIGHT TRAINING (3 days a week)

Day 1 - chest, shoulders, and triceps

Day 2 - back and biceps

Day 3 - legs

Due to talent, I spar more rounds than normal. However, as long as your timing and technique are working out, then you have reached your objective for sparring. My conditioning comes from cardio (running) and my “gym work.” As for my performance results, I only get out of it how much work I put into it……which is always 110%! I train and practice the way I want to perform. I fight smart. I always do my best, AND I never give up.

Since becoming a Champion, nutrition and strength conditioning have become a greater part of my regimen. When I don’t have a scheduled fight, I continue to train completely, but with less rounds of sparring, less running, and my nutrition isn’t as strict. However, during this time I concentrate on whatever weaknesses I believe need work. Irrespective of my opponent, my training regimen remains the same, but my gameplan and technique change from fight to fight.

Lastly, the best advice I could give to a young professional boxer is always read your contracts and always sign the checks.

Paulie Ayala lives and trains in Ft. Worth, Texas with his wife, Leti, and two children. He is the current IBO Super Bantamweight Champion, former WBA Bantamweight Champion, former NABF Bantamweight Champion, “Ring” Magazine “1999 Fighter of the Year,” 1989 Texas State Golden Gloves Amateur Champion (119 pounds), and the 1986 National Junior Olympic Amateur Champion (112 pounds). Henry Mendez trains Paulie. He is 31, with a professional record of 34-1, 12 KO’s. Paulie’s web page address is: www.paulieayala.com.



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