Ask The Editors
SecondsOut.com Logo - click here to go back to the home page
News divider Features divider Schedules & Results divider Rankings and Stats divider Community My Profile
Login

SHOP | RADIO | TV

COLUMNS  |  TV  |  RADIO  |  GALLERY  |  AWARDS  |  OLYMPICS  |  RINGSIDE & TRAINING  |  LEGENDS  |  WRITE 4 US

26 MAY 2017

 

Thomas Hauser is the author of 34 books including 'Muhammad Ali: His Life And Times'. In 2005, he was honored by the Boxing Writers Association of America, which bestowed the Nat Fleischer Award for career excellence in boxing journalism upon him. He was the first Internet writer ever to receive the honor. Thomas describes writing for Secondsout.com as a chance to 'explore new frontiers and deliver cutting-edge material to website readers'. His next book - ‘The Greatest Sport of All' - will be published by the University of Arkansas Press later this year.

 

Use the search box below to reference Hauser's entire archive from 2001 to date on Secondsout.





Features Articles
101 - 150 of 254   Articles
24/7 and Countdown: Docudrama or Infomercial ?

24/7 and Countdown: Docudrama or Infomercial ?

By Thomas Hauser

The line between programming and marketing in sports is often blurred. Two HBO offerings -- 24/7 and Countdown – exemplify this circumstance. 24/7 and Countdown: Docudrama or Infomercial ?
Ticket Scalping, Mayweather-Hatton, and Boxing

Ticket Scalping, Mayweather-Hatton, and Boxing

By Thomas Hauser

There’s a time-honored promotional tactic in the entertainment industry. Create a buzz that an event is where everyone wants to be; and suddenly, because of the buzz, everyone wants to be there. Ticket Scalping, Mayweather-Hatton, and Boxing
Ricky Hatton in Las Vegas: Dreams vs. Reality

Ricky Hatton in Las Vegas: Dreams vs. Reality

By Thomas Hauser

“Every so often,” essayist Arthur Krystal writes, “two men arise with differently cast minds representing different constituencies, who capture the attention of people not normally disposed to view a fight. Perhaps each battler embodies the interested spectator’s own hopes of how the world works.” Ricky Hatton in Las Vegas: Dreams vs. Reality
A Boxing Fan Looks At MMA

A Boxing Fan Looks At MMA

By Thomas Hauser

Today’s video-game culture and increasingly violent movies have spawned a demand for entertainment that offers clearly-visible mayhem. A Boxing Fan Looks At MMA
Cotto-Mosley: Youth Will Be Served

Cotto-Mosley: Youth Will Be Served

By Thomas Hauser

Some of boxing’s most memorable battles have been contested in the courtroom, not the ring. Cotto-Mosley: Youth Will Be Served
More Important Than Boxing: 2007

More Important Than Boxing: 2007

By Thomas Hauser

We don’t stop being citizens when we enter the world of sports. With that in mind, once a year I use this space to address issues that are more important than boxing. More Important Than Boxing: 2007
Vinny Maddalone: “When the Candle Burns Out, I’ll Walk Away”

Vinny Maddalone: “When the Candle Burns Out, I’ll Walk Away”

By Thomas Hauser

Vinny Maddalone is a club fighter with the heart of a champion. Boxrec.com lists him as the 206th-ranked heavyweight in the world. His records stands at 28 wins and 4 losses with 19 knockouts. There was a fifth loss, but the verdict was changed to “no contest” after his opponent tested positive for marijuana. Vinny Maddalone: “When the Candle Burns Out, I’ll Walk Away”
My 81-Year-Old Mother Meets Don King

My 81-Year-Old Mother Meets Don King

By Thomas Hauser

I have a great mother. She got married at nineteen, and I was a wedding night baby. She isn’t young anymore, but she’s still young at heart. My 81-Year-Old Mother Meets Don King
Taylor-Pavlik: “And NEW Middleweight Champion of the World . . .”

Taylor-Pavlik: “And NEW Middleweight Champion of the World . . .”

By Thomas Hauser

For most of the world, a prize fight is a sporting event, entertainment, a show. For a fighter, each bout carries the potential to be a crucial turning point in his life. Taylor-Pavlik: “And NEW Middleweight Champion of the World . . .”
Jack Dempsey Revisited

Jack Dempsey Revisited

By Thomas Hauser

September 22nd will mark the eightieth anniversary of the famous “long count” fight between Jack Dempsey and Gene Tunney. The two men are remembered as adjoining links in history’s chain of heavyweight champions. But Dempsey was more than just another champion. He was one of the most charismatic fighters in ring history and the bridge between boxing’s old and modern eras. Jack Dempsey Revisited
Notes and Nuggets

Notes and Nuggets

By Thomas Hauser

In the past, I’ve recounted the memories of boxing personalities regarding the first professional fight they ever saw. The recollections of four more individuals who have left their mark on the sweet science follow: Notes and Nuggets
Notes and Nuggets

Notes and Nuggets

By Thomas Hauser

The recent betting scandal involving NBA referee Tim Donaghy should be a wake-up call for other sports. Donaghy, as virtually everyone in the sports world now knows, pled guilty to two felonies related to allegations that he had passed information to organized crime figures and placed bets on NBA games that he officiated. Notes and Nuggets
Are There Fewer Good Trainers Than Before ?

Are There Fewer Good Trainers Than Before ?

By Thomas Hauser

As sports and technology have evolved over the years, training and coaching have evolved with them. From video-tape to computer analysis to sports medicine, the sources of improvement are endless. By way of example, some of the men who won gold medals in swimming at the 1960 Rome Olympics wouldn’t have qualified for the women’s finals at the 2004 Athens games. Are There Fewer Good Trainers Than Before ?
If There’s Free Food, Grab It

If There’s Free Food, Grab It

By Thomas Hauser

There’s a centuries-old proverb, “Whose bread I eat, his song I sing.”

Howard Cosell used to declaim, “You can buy the writers for a ham sandwich.”

“With some writers, it’s in their DNA,” says former Boxing Writers Association of America president Bernard Fernandez. “If it’s free, they have to eat it.” If There’s Free Food, Grab It
Bernard Hopkins: History in the Making

Bernard Hopkins: History in the Making

By Thomas Hauser

Bernard Hopkins is a writer’s fighter. He’s quotable and charismatic with marvellous ring skills to match his persona. He’s also an exceedingly complex man with personal potential that has yet to be fully tapped. He can be smart and foolish, diplomatic and brusque, funny and mean, charming and cruel. At times, he’s wise. Bernard Hopkins: History in the Making
Bernard Hopkins: He’s Baaack !

Bernard Hopkins: He’s Baaack !

By Thomas Hauser: Glory came late for Bernard Hopkins.

Bernard’s first pro fight was at age 23 for a purse of four hundred dollars. He lost, sat out for sixteen months, returned to the ring in 1990, and was defeated only once over the next fifteen years. In 1995, he captured the IBF middleweight crown with a seventh-round knockout of Segundo Mercado. Ultimately, he made twenty consecutive title defenses. Bernard Hopkins: He’s Baaack !
Hauser’s Fourteen

Hauser’s Fourteen

By Thomas Hauser

In April 2001, I was in Las Vegas for the fight between Naseem Hamed and Marco Antonio Barrera. Meanwhile, in the days before their encounter, the arena at the MGM Grand was taken over by Julia Roberts, George Clooney, and company, who were filming a remake of Ocean’s Eleven. Hauser’s Fourteen
Larry Merchant and HBO

Larry Merchant and HBO

By Thomas Hauser

The recent contract negotiations between Larry Merchant and HBO offer insight into several facets of the relationship between boxing and the media. Larry Merchant and HBO
Bob Arum Mans the Ramparts with Cotto-Judah

Bob Arum Mans the Ramparts with Cotto-Judah

By Thomas Hauser

The first fight that Bob Arum promoted was Muhammad Ali versus George Chuvalo in 1966. Arum is 75 years old now. He and Don King are self-described “dinosaurs of the sport.” But while King has seen his influence fade in recent years, Arum’s remains constant. His current roster of fighters includes Manny Pacquiao, Antonio Margarito, Kelly Pavlik, Erik Morales, Jose Luis Castillo, Humberto Soto, Kid Diamond, Jorge Arce, Julio Cesar Chavez Jr, Hasim Rahman, and Migue Bob Arum Mans the Ramparts with Cotto-Judah
The Enigmatic Shannon Briggs

The Enigmatic Shannon Briggs

By Thomas Hauser

Perpendicular to the boardwalk in Atlantic City, a four-story shopping mall called The Pier Shops at Caesars extends across a narrow beach and juts out over the Atlantic Ocean. Standing at the eastern end of the mall, one can gaze at the ocean and see Herman Melville’s “great shroud of the sea” as it rolled on thousands of years ago. The Enigmatic Shannon Briggs
Tempest Storm

Tempest Storm

By Thomas Hauser

She’s 79 years old now and lives in a one-bedroom apartment in East Las Vegas, the industrial part of town. Defying age, she has managed to remain both shapely and slender. She’s charming and disarming with an air of refinement and still has long fiery-red hair. Tempest Storm
Floyd’s World

Floyd’s World

By Thomas Hauser
The May 5th fight between Oscar De La Hoya and Floyd Mayweather Jr might turn out to be the largest-grossing fight in the history of boxing. Over the next few months, thousands of articles will be written about the combatants. Their respective pysches will be thoroughly explored. I don’t claim intimate knowledge of either man, but one experience with Mayweather stands out in my mind. Floyd’s World

HBO Boxing: The Challenge

By Thomas Hauser
Boxing is struggling, and 2007 will bring new challenges for the sport. Showtime has publicly announced its intention to televise mixed martial arts. Meanwhile, HBO is committed to televising three UFC shows during the coming year with an option for three more. HBO's current plan is to air the shows at midnight on dates still to be determined. No matter how these telecasts are packaged, ultimately they will compete with boxing. HBO Boxing: The Challenge

Jermain Taylor: The Homecoming

By Thomas Hauser
Some fighters have their hometown behind them. Jermain Taylor has an entire state.

Arkansas isn't known for boxing. Sonny Liston, Tommy Freeman, and Taylor are the only undisputed world champions to have been born there. But unlike the other three, Jermain has lived his entire life in Razorback territory. "Arkansas is my home," he says. Jermain Taylor: The Homecoming

Courage

By Thomas Hauser
"Courage," Irish scholar C. S. Lewis wrote, "is every virtue at the testing point." But courage has special meaning for professional boxers. Courage

Holiday Reading: 2006

By Thomas Hauser
Each year during the holiday season, I publish a list of what I consider to be the best books on the sweet science. That list, updated with recently published titles, follows. Some of these books are now out of print. But with the proliferation of online services like Abebooks.com, Alibris.com, and Amazon.com, all of them can be found. Holiday Reading: 2006

The Heavyweights

By Thomas Hauser
On June 8, 2002, Lennox Lewis knocked out Mike Tyson in Memphis. Since then, there has been only one real heavyweight championship fight. That was Lewis's stoppage of Vitali Klitschko on June 21, 2003. The Heavyweights

More Important Than Boxing

By Thomas Hauser
I received an email recently from a reader complaining about an article that I wrote twenty-one months ago. The article was entitled "Jack Newfield and George Bush" and recounted my final conversation with Jack Newfield, who died of cancer in December 2004. More Important Than Boxing

The Colossus of Clones

By Thomas Hauser
Boxing is the world's hardest sport and also the world's hardest business. Earlier this month, Nikolai Valuev and Thomas Adamek defended their titles at the Allstate Arena in Rosemont, Illinois. Tucked away on the undercard in an off-television bout was a man who, sixteen months ago, stood at the center of the boxing universe. The Colossus of Clones

Nikolai Valuev: More Than Meets The Eye

By Thomas Hauser
Let's start with some thoughts from Nikolai Valuev himself. He was born in Leningrad (now St. Petersburg) on August 21, 1973. He's the World Boxing Association heavyweight champion, stands 7-feet-2-inches tall, weighs 328 pounds, and has 45 wins in 45 fights. Nikolai Valuev: More Than Meets The Eye
The Continuing Education of Ireland’s John Duddy

The Continuing Education of Ireland’s John Duddy

By Thomas Hauser
On September 29th, John Duddy fought Yory Boy Campas at the Theater at Madison Square Garden. The fight was made by Team Duddy with the expectation that it would be the next step up the ladder for the popular Irish middleweight. Instead, it became a harrowing journey and a defining fight in ways that were both good and bad. The Continuing Education of Ireland’s John Duddy

Steve Farhood

By Thomas Hauser
"I was clearly a mistake." Those are Steve Farhood's first words when asked to provide biographical data about himself. "I'm the last of four children," he elaborates. "And my parents were divorced one month before I was born."

Farhood might have been a mistake, but he doesn't make many of them. Over the course of 28 years in boxing, he has fashioned a well-deserved reputation for integrity and competence. Steve Farhood

Hey, Bernard; Go Back To School

By Thomas Hauser
Millions of students will be going back to school this week, and many of them will be asked to write the time-honored essay, "What I Did On My Summer Vacation". Thus, it's worth checking in with one of boxing's finest students -- Bernard Hopkins, who retired from the sweet science this year following a unanimous decision triumph over Antonio Tarver. Hey, Bernard; Go Back To School

Tim Smith

By Thomas Hauser
Sara Lee cakes once had a promotional jingle that went, "Everybody doesn't like something; but nobody doesn't like Sara Lee."

Similarly, everybody doesn't like someone; but nobody doesn't like Tim Smith. Tim Smith

Don King At 75

By Thomas Hauser

There are times when it's hard to like Don King. And there are times when it's hard to dislike him.

King is unique; a man of foresight, vision, and (some say) foul play. Hard-working, brilliant, charismatic; he's one of the most complex people ever to grace the American scene. His rise in the sweet science is almost as remarkable as Muhammad Ali's. He is an icon and a legend in his own time. Don King At 75

Boxing After Dark on HBO

By Thomas Hauser
Boxing After Dark made its debut on February 3, 1996. Through July 29th of this year, it has been home to 157 fights.

The idea behind the original Boxing After Dark series was to give the public competitive fights between exciting young fighters on the rise. But on occasion, the show was a vehicle of accommodation. Instead putting "stars of the future" in competitive bouts, HBO opted at times for mismatches to showcase a particular fighter. Boxing After Dark on HBO

Lee Samuels and Alan Hopper

By Thomas Hauser
Bob Arum and Don King aren't ordinary people. They're brilliant and demanding, focused and driven; admired in some circles and disliked in others. They've dominated the sweet science for longer than most of today's fighters have been alive. And each of them relies on a savvy director of public relations to help achieve his goals. Lee Samuels and Alan Hopper

Roy Jones In Idaho

By Thomas Hauser
When Roy Jones was young, he glowed. There was an aura about him and words came out of his mouth like bursts of machine-gun fire. The glow is gone now. Roy's face looks old for his 37 years and there's a bit of cotton in his voice. Roy Jones In Idaho

Nevada's "Safety Committee" Report

By Thomas Hauser
At long last, the Nevada State Athletic Commission's Advisory Committee on Boxer Health and Safety has issued its report. Many of the recommendations simply call for further study of problems or suggest that the NSAC ask the state legislature for additional funds to address an issue. Nevada's "Safety Committee" Report

Richard Schaefer and The Golden Boy Empire

By Thomas Hauser
Richard Schaefer is an interesting man. Soft-spoken, polite, smart with old-world sensibilities. Like his father, he has a passion for collecting classic Swiss stamps (those from 1848 through 1875, when the postal system in Switzerland changed). He's fluent in Swiss German (his native language), German, French, and English, and also speaks a bit of Spanish. Richard Schaefer and The Golden Boy Empire

Legacy Fights: Hopkins-Tarver and Taylor-Wright

By Thomas Hauser
Fights that shape a fighter's legacy are rare in boxing.

Earlier this month, four elite fighters stepped into the ring in two fights on back-to-back weekends. On June 10th, Bernard Hopkins moved up in weight to challenge Antonio Tarver for the right to be called the best light-heavyweight in the world. Eight days later, Jermain Taylor defended his middleweight championship against Winky Wright. Legacy Fights: Hopkins-Tarver and Taylor-Wright

The Matchmakers

By Thomas Hauser

"Matchmaker, matchmaker, make me a match,
Find me a find, catch me a catch
Matchmaker, matchmaker, look through your book,
And make me a perfect match."


Lyrics by Shelson Harnick, Fiddler on the Roof The Matchmakers

George Ward: The Inspector

By Thomas Hauser
Go to a fight. Watch each corner between rounds. If the fight is being properly regulated, someone will be standing on the ring apron just outside the ropes, staring intently at the interplay between the fighter, his trainer, and anyone else who's involved. That observer is an inspector. George Ward: The Inspector

Oscar and Ricky: Blue Chip and Blue Collar

By Thomas Hauser
Oscar De La Hoya and Ricky Hatton are boxing's poster boys on either side of the Atlantic Ocean. Earlier this month, they were showcased on consecutive weekends in major fights. And to draw them closer in the public mind, HBO televised a rerun of De La Hoya's May 6th fight with Ricardo Mayorga as the lead-in to a live telecast of Hatton's May 13th bout against Luis Collazo. Oscar and Ricky: Blue Chip and Blue Collar

Dan Rafael

By Thomas Hauser

"A sportswriter," Jimmy Cannon once wrote, "is entombed in a prolonged boyhood." If Cannon were alive today, he might cite Dan Rafael to prove his point.

Rafael is the boxing writer for ESPN.com. He writes breaking news, feature stories, a weekly notebook, and Monday wrap-up. He also answers questions during online chats and compiles rankings. Reading his work enables fans to keep current in the sweet science. Dan Rafael

Who's Betting What On The Fights?

By Thomas Hauser

Boxing has a problem; a big one. Think of it as a monster that's hiding under the bed. Eventually, the monster is going to come out and take a big chunk out of boxing.

Fighters, trainers, managers, promoters, even government regulators, can legally bet on fights. They can also bet on fights that they're involved with. Who's Betting What On The Fights?

Lamon Brewster and the Medical Mess

By Thomas Hauser: It has been widely reported that Lamon Brewster suffered a detached retina in his left eye in the first round of his April 1st WBO heavyweight title fight against Sergei Liakhovich in Cleveland, Ohio.

However, multiple sources tell SecondsOut that these reports don't tell the whole story. Yes, Brewster suffered a detached retina during the Liakhovich fight. But his eye was injured BEFORE the bout. Lamon Brewster and the Medical Mess

Paulie

By Thomas Hauser

Some fighters let their fists do their talking for them. Not Paulie Malignaggi.

Malignaggi is a flashy dresser with a big mouth who's basically a good guy. He's also a walking poster boy for hair gel and wears so many tassels on his boxing shoes that it's like fighting with five-pound weights on his feet. Paulie

James Toney, Hasim Rahman, and the Battle of the Bulge

By Thomas Hauser
"Boxing," Jon Saraceno once wrote, "remains in a perpetual eight-count time warp." To prove that theory, one need look no further than today's heavyweight muddle.

There was a time when a heavyweight championship bout was a seismic event in the world of sports. Now, with four "champions," few people know when a title fight is taking place, let alone care. James Toney, Hasim Rahman, and the Battle of the Bulge

Elite Referees Recall Their Most Memorable Fight

By Thomas Hauser
Fighters are never alone in the ring. Metaphorically, yes; but not literally. There's always a third man. Yet fans tend to forget the referee unless there's controversy or worse.

Dave Barry is enshrined in boxing lore as the arbiter who presided over the "long count" in the second bout between Jack Dempsey and Gene Tunney. Elite Referees Recall Their Most Memorable Fight
Displaying: 101-150 of 254
Results: 1 2 3 4 5 Next Go to:
Subscribe to feed Subscribe to feed
<--->
License/buy our content  |  Privacy policy  |  Terms & conditions  |  Copyright  |  Advertising guide  |  Site Map  |  Write for SecondsOut.com  |  SecondsOut Contacts  |  Contact Us

© 2000 - 2011 Knockout Entertainment Ltd & SecondsOut.com